Category Archives: King

Art Nouveau. (1890-1910)

Art Nouveau, is an international philosophy and style of art, architecture and applied art – especially the decorative arts – that was most popular during 1890–1910. English uses the French name Art Nouveau ("new art"), but the style has many different names in other countries. A reaction to academic art of the 19th century, it…
lire la suite

La Belle Epoque. (1879-1914)

The Belle Époque or La Belle Époque French for "Beautiful Era") was a period of Western European history. It is conventionally dated from the end of the Franco-Prussian War in 1871 to the outbreak of World War I in 1914. Occurring during the era of the French Third Republic (beginning 1870), it was a period…
lire la suite

French Third Republic. (1870-1940)

The French Third Republic (French: governed France from 1870, when the Second French Empire collapsed, to 1940, when France's defeat by Nazi Germany led to the Vichy France government. Vichy was replaced by the French Fourth Republic. The early days of the Third Republic were dominated by the Franco-Prussian War, which the Republic continued to…
lire la suite

Second Empire Napoleon III (1852-1870)

French coup d'état of 1851 On 2 December 1851 Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte, who had been elected President of the Republic, staged a coup d'état by dissolving the National Assembly without having the constitutional right to do so. He thus became sole ruler of France, and re-established universal suffrage, previously abolished by the Assembly. His decisions and…
lire la suite

Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte. (1848-1852)

French Second Republic French Revolution of 1848 The industrial population of the faubourgs was welcomed by the National Guard on their way towards the center of Paris. Barricades were raised after the shooting of protestors outside the Guizot manor by soldiers. On 23 February 1848 Guizot's cabinet resigned, abandoned by the petite bourgeoisie, on whose…
lire la suite

Louis Philippe 1° (1830-1848)

Louis Philippe I (6 October 1773 – 26 August 1850) was King of the French from 1830 to 1848 as the leader of the Orleanais party. His father Louis Philippe II, Duke of Orleans had supported the Revolution of 1789 but was nevertheless guillotined during the Reign of Terror. Louis Philippe fled France and spent…
lire la suite

Charles X, 1824-1830

The ascension to the throne of Charles X, the leader of the ultra-royalist faction, coincided with the ultras' control of power in the Chamber of Deputies; thus, the ministry of the comte de Villèle was able to continue, and the last "restraint" on the ultra-royalists was removed. As the country underwent a Christian revival in…
lire la suite

Second Restoration. Louis XVIII. (1815-1824)

Talleyrand was again influential in seeing that the Bourbons reigned, as was Fouché, Napoleon's minister of police during the Hundred Days. This Second Restoration saw the beginning of the Second White Terror, largely in the south, when supporters of the monarchy sought revenge against those who had supported Napoleon's return, killing 200–300 and forcing thousands…
lire la suite

Hundred Days. (March 1815-July 1815)

The Hundred Days, sometimes known as the Hundred Days of Napoleon or Napoleon's Hundred Days, marked the period between Napoleon's return from exile on the island of Elba to Paris on 20 March 1815 and the second restoration of King Louis XVIII on 8 July 1815 (a period of 111 days). This period saw the War…
lire la suite

First Restoration Louis XVIII. (April 1814- March 1815)

The Bourbon Restoration was the period of French history following the fall of Napoleon in 1814 until the July Revolution of 1830. The brothers of executed King Louis XVI reigned in highly conservative fashion, and the exiles returned. They were nonetheless unable to reverse most of the changes made by the French Revolution and Napoleon.…
lire la suite